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Simulation tools aim to bridge exclusion gap
Simulation tools aim to bridge exclusion gap
A SET of gloves and glasses which simulate common physical limitations, like age-related long-sightedness or arthritis, have been released in the hope of getting more designers to think again about the usability of their products. 
Researchers at the University of Cambridge's Engineering Design Centre say millions of people around the country - in particular the ageing, baby-boomer generation - have unnecessary difficulty using everyday products ranging from gadgets, to packaging, to windows and doors, because of poor design. Addressing these issues would also reduce the costs of social care. 
The simulation gloves and glasses, which are on sale from the inclusive design toolkit website, allow designers to experience these limitations for themselves, so that they can identify opportunities for design improvements that would help these "baby-boomers".  
Dr Sam Walleris pictured wearing the simulation glasses and gloves.

Ladies' honour for Helena
Ladies' honour for Helena
HELENA Lucas MBE was awarded the Ladies' Day Trophy at the Aberdeen Asset Management Cowes Week Ladies' Day ceremony. 
Helena was chosen as the winner of the prestigious accolade from a strong line-up of nominees, but it was her sheer determination that has encouraged many other women to become involved in sailing that contributed to her being presented with the prize. 
Helena, who was born with no thumbs and limited extension in her arms, made history claiming 2.4mR Paralympic gold medal at London 2012, becoming the first ever female winner of the male dominated Paralympic class and Britain's first ever Paralympic sailing gold medallist. 
Helena Lucas MBE is picturedin action at Cowes Week. Picture credit: Rick Tomlinson.

Amputee uses experiences to help others
Amputee uses experiences to help others
A CARETAKER who suffered horrific injuries when he fell from a ladder at work that resulted in him losing his leg, is using his experience to help others by setting up a support group for other West Midland based amputees. 
Paul Felton, from Willenhall, had his left leg removed below the knee in February 2013 after his ankle was crushed in a fall in April 2011 and multiple infections prevented it from healing. 
Concerned by the lack of help and support available to amputees in the region, Paul decided to turn what happened into a positive and has set up the West Midlands Amputee Support Group to help people talk about their experiences and share advice on coping with losing a limb. 
Pictured is Paul Felton.

Blind amputee to tackle London to Brighton trek
Blind amputee to tackle London to Brighton trek
A BLIND amputee is getting ready to take part in a gruelling 100km hike to raise money for Blind Veterans UK, the charity for blinded ex-Servicemen and women. 
Clive Huntingford, a former Navy communicator who served in the Falklands, set himself the challenge of completing Blind Veterans UK's London to Brighton. The annual trek, which is the charity's biggest fundraiser, is due to take place next summer. 
The walk takes participants from south London, through countryside paths in Surrey, Sussex and the North and South Downs, and ends at the charity's centre in Ovingdean, Brighton.  
Clive Huntingford and his wife Anne.

Health minister officially opens new rehab centre
Health minister officially opens new rehab centre
THE £9.5m Specialist Rehabilitation Centre at Morriston Hospital has been officially opened by health minister Mark Drakeford. 
Home to the Artificial Limb and Appliance Centre, Rehabilitation Engineering Unit and Orthotics Service, the state-of-the-art centre brings services for patients using artificial limbs and/ or mobility aids under one roof. 
It has consulting rooms, a physiotherapy gym and occupational therapy facilities, as well as workshops for technicians to manufacture limbs, aids or equipment. Included in the interior decoration are images of patients at home, work, school and leisure providing inspiration to others. 
Prosthetics manager Peter McCarthy is pictured explaining the service to Mark Drakeford.
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